Thoughts on Resumes

See attached for a resume template and the template filled in.

1. First, a resume communicates "what you can do" / "who you are" in 20 seconds.  After a quick look, the reader should be able to say something like, he/she is "a hands-on operations person who likes to create and fix and then move on."

2. Second, if the person elects to read more, in 60 seconds, a few other concepts should be communicated such as, "and a good mix of operations and accounting, good product knowledge in both big and small firms."

3. Stand out by using the STAR's approach* and use RESULTS on your resume.  Most people write what they do on their resume not how well they do it - use objective, quantifiable results.  Also, please see the below Harvard Business Review article titled, "How to Write a Resume that Stands Out," that talks further about this.

4. Customize your resume if responding to a position with a position description by using keywords from the description in your resume when you have the experience that the keyword is associated with as this article explains.

You have to keep it simple.

Review the bottom resume example (Suggested.Resume.Completed.docx) first.  Download the template (Suggested.Resume.Completed.Template.docx) if you want to use the format for your resume.  

Also included is a template to a cover letter (CoverLetter.Template.doc ).

Here are some resume examples from eFinancialCareers.

* Every text block on your resume describing skills or jobs, should be in the ‘Situation – Action – Result’ format. Situation – what was happening at the time? Action – what did you do? Result – what was the outcome (hopefully it was positive, increasing sales by 10%, winning recognition from superiors, or creating positive buzz around product X). The result is usually the hardest thing for people to get.
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John Breault,
May 9, 2011, 9:02 AM
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John Breault,
Jun 5, 2015, 2:13 PM
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John Breault,
May 9, 2011, 8:48 AM
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John Breault,
May 9, 2011, 8:48 AM
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